How to achieve personal growth over the years?

During the last six decades of the digital age, the processing power of personal computers doubled every two years, as predicted in 1965 by Gordon Moore, the legendary co-founder of Intel.

This exponential increase in data handling capacity not only represented a remarkable advance from a purely scientific perspective, but also an impact on our ability to acquire, process, convert and transmit knowledge.

But not only computers have behaved that way, since human knowledge also has its own Ley de Moore.

Indeed, while in the nineteenth century human knowledge doubled every hundred years, by the twentieth century that period had been reduced to just twenty-five, today it is estimated that it does so every two, and many predict that in no more than ten years humanity will double its collective knowledge every twelve hours.

Faced with this vertigo of numbers and exponentials, it is worth asking ourselves where they will have been, and what role they will have in our personal success, those things that we learned while we were attending university. Probably much less than we imagine.

It is difficult to assimilate, but if human knowledge doubles every two years, that means that at least half of what a graduate learns in the course of his or her career will no longer be state-of-the-art knowledge by the time they receive their diploma.

Thus, it is clear that it is necessary to propose a strategy for personal growth and development that allows us to maintain our professional competitiveness in the face of a world that moves rapidly under our feet, challenging every minute what we assume we know.

Many years ago, when I was still a student, an experienced teacher told me that in universities we trained students of the present on the basis of knowledge of the past, for jobs that most likely will not exist in the future. Today, I couldn’t agree more.

The challenge then arises of tackling an unavoidable and necessary process of personal updating that guarantees the maintenance of our relevance as professionals or entrepreneurs. It is essential to maintain a sense of urgency that encourages us to continue learning, but this also deserves reflection, since the key is not only in deciding what to learn, but in how to do it, because it is in that how where we will find the necessary competitive advantage to guarantee our relevance in a world that challenges us every minute.

Faced with the challenge of the obsolescence of knowledge, new methodologies, technologies and instructional models are imposed that, far from keeping us away from the new, add us to a collaborative process of knowledge generation.

For example, we can afford to chat with business gurus, or listen to their most recent presentation, thus staying on the crest of the wave of knowledge.

And with the same logic, we could also work with mentors hand in hand, shortening the distances of knowledge and going directly to the source.

Jorge Fantin

Many years ago, when I was still a student, an experienced teacher told me that in universities we trained students of the present on the basis of knowledge of the past, for jobs that most likely will not exist in the future. Today, I couldn’t agree more.

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