throwback to this trashy comics where a super-prostitute saves the world

The Proit’s the trash and parody comics during the post-9/11 period on a superheroine prostitute, by the creator of The BoysGarth Ennis.

The super-heroic genre covers a multitude of works with diverse treatment that mixes cultural phenomenon, modern mythology and critical mirror of our society. The one who understood the power of creation and destruction that these vigilantes above the law allowed was Garth Ennis.

The author of violent and mocking comics The Boys, from the most brutal and black arc of the Punisher or even the disturbing preacher is at the origin, with the designer Amanda Conner and the inker-screenwriter Jimmy Palmiotti, ofone of the most absurd works of the world of superheroes: The Pro. The story ? A prostitute with an apparent thong becomes a superheroine.

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Very shitty is the life of this anonymous prostitute who juggles between the members of her clients and the full diapers of her screaming baby in a seedy apartment. No bright destiny on the horizon – apart from the risk of wrist tendonitis from hard work – is waiting for this woman who is as jaded as she is a smoker. Yet a salacious alien voyeur decides to prove with her that every human is capable of becoming a great hero. So by pure chance, this stranger is going to be endowed with superpowers. Instantly, the Justice League of this world, the League of Honor, wants to recruit her.

This team of heroes is made up of a prudish Superman, a Batman the parts taking the wind under a short coat of mail with a Robin in a leotard clinging to him, a Wonder Woman more a stripper than a warrior, aa Flash in underpants and a Green Lantern in parody of clichés about African-Americans. As soon as engaged, the super-peripatetician faces off against a gang of enemies whose nouns – Noun, Verb, Adverb and Adjective – exemplify the I don’t care about disposable villains created to eat the fists of good heroes in comics. The Pro pulverizes the teeth of the naughty Name before introduce him to the invigorating benefits of the golden shower.

The Pro: comicsNo power, lots of responsibility

Obviously, the League of Honor does not appreciate this gesture from the masses and the Pro, refusing to comply with their rules, will lead her own life as a superheroine. His first action will be to help twenty fellow sex workers equipped with objects of various shapes to destroy the colon of a client with aggressive habits. After that, prostitute performs her best night’s work chaining men with his super-speed. The icing on the cake, she will even deflower Superman’s super andouillette. No luck, the superhuman’s juicy orgasm is going to go off so hard that he will tear off the wing of a passing plane, forcing the Man of Steel to save him from the air.

The humiliation is total for the League of Honor especially since the prostitute will add a dose of it by affirming thatthey are totally useless to a world that does not want this kind of hero after the attacks on the World Trade Center. But while the Pro is burning down the supers, a terrorist attack takes place in a New York building. The League arrives in time and, carnage later, the super-whore holds a primed nuke in her hand. She has no choice but to fly into space to explode with the weapon. Thus, from a night worker, she becomes a heroine whose sacrifice surpasses all the battles that an immortal Superman can lead.

The Pro: comicsIt’s… a zigounette!

live ammunition satire

When Garth Ennis tackles superheroes, it is rarely to give them the beautiful role. The comics The Boys, which has been adapted into an Amazon series, are one of the many proofs of the mister’s bratty delusions. Ennis is a screenwriter who hates the flagship characters of Marvel and DC, but knows how to exploit them to draw harsh criticism both gender and society. In the illustrations, it is the very active designer Amanda Conner who has worked with all the major American comic book publishers from the 90s to the present day. The character’s last co-creator was Jimmy Palmiotti, who inked and helped promote the comics greatly, according to Ennis.

The Pro is published one year after the attacks of September 11 and is intended an acid satire against the superheroes in this time which tilts towards terror. Ennis will destroy these characters far from a reality where no guy in tights comes to save hundreds of civilians. Thus, like the Avengers and the Justice League, the Honor League has a HQ that keeps them away from the people (here a building). Likewise, their enemies are forgettable nominative, if not ridiculous, citizens who don’t care. All the more reason to join the team exhibitionist buffoons, whose appearance reflects their inadequacy with an America marked by barbarism without honor.

The Pro: comicsyesterday’s heroes

All this justifies the gore, the exposed breasts, the insults and other buttocks that flower the comics, because they come to reinforce the image of a blunt representation of reality where scantily clad superheroes pass for degenerates. Even the lettering, written entirely by hand by Amanda Conner – while usually mostly typed on the computer – contributes to this impression of an imperfect and raw world. Because although the heroine passes for a Bigard in fishnet stockings, she is characterized as an ordinary mother trying to surviveand that the League does not understand.

If the comics is certainly funny in its black humor and outspokenness garnished with swear words from its atypical anti-heroine, it is above all very pessimistic. His character is completely jaded by society and the impossibility of a better tomorrow. A depressive state most certainly similar to that of many Americans during this period, including that of the authors. Thus, it is necessary to bear this context in mind when reading The Pro, several lines of dialogue or drawings reflect a blind anger, sometimes racist or downright vengeful.

The Pro: comicsHistory rewritten

The Pro is not to be taken lightly as it is believed in its message as violent as its graphics. However, there remains a work that is closer to the nihilistic cover-up and alluring letter of intent, than to the simple, stupidly provocative comic strip. An interesting comic for its caricatural tone as for his political discourse witnessing an America still in shock at the beginning of a black period in modern American history.

In 2009, Paramount Pictures bought the rights to the comics to adapt it into a film, but the news on the project has not been rushing to the gate since. Nevertheless, the idea has something to make curious. With a modernized speech adapted to a cinema flooded with superheroes, The Pro totally has what it takes to be a jewel of delirious black humor.

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